...Well, neither have I. At least I didn't last night. I saw the tops of light poles and the pier on which I walked just a couple of weeks ago. And, in fact, I surmised that the reason they were built the way they were built was to accomodate possible rising waters. Little did I know...

Last night was the first chance I've had to get out and see the flood waters up close. It's pretty humbling. I can't imagine what I'm going to see when I get out into the county (but not too far out) in the daytime hours. Joe Lowe, the morning show host on WBKR's sister station, WOMI, has done yeoman work on our sister website 1490womi.com. And now that the unprecedented week-plus-long severe weather system has left the area, we're all a little freer to move about the county and survey for ourselves, all the while taking the utmost precaution. We are, after all, under a state of emergency. I also want to tip my hat to the News25 weather team, with whom we've been working during all this severe weather. Chief meteorologist Wayne Hart and fellow meteorologists David Heckard and Scott Dimmich have been knocking it out of the park. They've not only been endlessly helpful to all of us, they've educated me personally on quite a few aspects of weather systems with which I wasn't familiar. It's been quite a week, but we're not out of the woods yet. The severe storms may have moved on, but flood warnings and watches remain in place as rivers and streams continue to rise. We still may have a long way to go.