March 14th isn't the only pie day. The fourth Thursday in November is also a pretty good pie day. So here it is summertime and I'm talking about Thanksgiving.

No, I'm not.

I'm talking about PIE.

I am not a big cake fan at all. Oh sure, there are some I like, obviously, but I'm not a fan of the texture. I much prefer pie.

See, I can't quit talking about it.

Anyway, when it comes to Thanksgiving, we don't really go in for the general traditions like apple pie and pumpkin pie. My sister doesn't care for the former and most of my family don't care for the latter. And my sister does the baking.

That always means chess pie and that is a unanimous choice with my group.

She uses my grandmother's recipe, except I'm not sure "recipe" is an accurate word since she NEVER wrote it down. Honestly, my sister, Sharon, never found one so she figured it out. And so we have chess pie every year. And, truthfully, we WOULD have a store-bought pumpkin pie handy for the sake of tradition, but since my mom really is the only one in the family who likes it, that stopped making sense. A whole pie for one piece.

So now, it's just chess pie, and usually two of them.

Last Thanksgiving, Sharon kicked it up a notch by adding a thin layer of snickerdoodle fudge on top after it cooled.

And, voila, snickerdoodle chess pie. It was insanely delicious, but really rich. I recommend coffee as an accompaniment. Here's a side view of this ridiculous creation:

Dave Spencer/Townsquare Media

Now, I found a chess pie recipe online that is nearly identical to how my sister makes it, so I'd go with it if you've never had one and want to give it a shot.

And just get a snickerdoodle fudge mix from the store (or any fudge mix you think would work) and pour a thin layer over the top of the cooled pie when you're finished.

It is such a simple recipe but it delivers world-class flavor.

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