Who forgot to change your clocks this past weekend and wound up getting to church or wherever you needed to be Sunday morning one hour late?

Or maybe you use your mobile phone and it does the update for you and you don't have to worry about it. I fall into that latter category, thankfully.

HOW MUCH LONGER DO WE HAVE TO DO THE DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME DANCE?

Do you know what else I may be thankful for before 2022 comes to an end? The possibility of eliminating from my vocabulary the phrases "losing an hour of sleep" and "spring forward, fall back." Most of all, I'll NEVER miss the sun crashing below the horizon before 5 PM if the U.S. House of Representatives does its best representing and puts the final nail in the coffin of his whole Daylight Saving Time dance.

DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME MAY BECOME PERMANENT

The United States Senate has approved a bill that would MAKE Daylight Saving Time permanent. Oh yeah, we would be able to rid ourselves of the phrase "Daylight Saving Time." I guess we'd just call it...oh, I don't know...TIME.

Again the House and the president need to rubberstamp it, but I can't imagine they wouldn't. It seems to be a near consensus that DST coming to an end in November is NOT popular at all. And you don't just have to take Grandpa Jones' word for it.

By the way, the bill has an official name.

THEY TRIED ENDING DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ONCE BEFORE

Apparently, a lot has changed over the last 48 years. In 1974, making Daylight Saving Time permanent was given a shot and was quickly shot down. The Washingtonian shared a newspaper headline from January 8th of that year that reads "Daylight Time Is Like Darkness Time." (The fact that, out of context, that doesn't make sense, was probably not a concern.)

THE HISTORY OF DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME

First employed in Canada in 1908, Daylight Saving Time was adopted in the United States in 1918 but wasn't a year-round occurrence until a declaration by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II. Still, no federal law regarding its observance existed until 1966 when the Uniform Time Act was passed. And even at that, it hasn't been observed in every state--Arizona and Hawaii have never been on board.

I say--and, seriously, no pun intended--it's about time. It's inconsistent; it annoys people; and, most of all, it just doesn't feel necessary.

Now we wait and see.

Tick tock, tick tock.

What Owensboroans Want to See Happen in Owensboro in 2022

If wishes were horses, beggars would ride, as the saying goes. But there's also a saying my mother used a lot--"Put feet to your prayers." So let's see if those two old adages can come together and make any of these suggestions happen over the next 11-plus months.

26 Images That Show How Owensboro Has Changed Over the Years

While driving in parts of Owensboro that have undergone changes, have you ever said to yourself, "I can't remember what it used to look like here"? Well, I'm here to help.