Are you familiar with the annual Frymire Forecast here in Kentucky? It's the brainchild of Dick Frymire of Irvington, Kentucky. Dick passed away in 2013, but his family has continued his tradition of using a Japanese elm tree and a 'special formula' to predict winter weather patterns for the Commonwealth. Here's a look at the latest 2023-2024 Frymire Winter Weather Forecast.

attachment-Snow Frymire
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Pay close attention to what the forecast calls for on January 17th. The Frymires predicted the first significant snowfall of the winter to land in the middle of January. And, if the current scenario plays out, it may happen.

This morning, we talked to Eyewitness News Meteorologist Ron Rhodes this morning and he confirmed that a bitterly cold snow event is heading our way Sunday into Monday. He says the precipitation we get Sunday into Monday is going to be "all snow."

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AccuWeather is currently predicting snow as well. While, like Ron, they are not predicting any snowfall totals at this time, their Sunday/Monday forecast for next week is calling for hours and hours of snow- on top of bitterly cold highs and lows.

Here's a look at the current forecast for Sunday night, Monday and Monday night.

AccuWeather
AccuWeather
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AccuWeather
AccuWeather
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While Ron and AccuWeather haven't yet started predicting snowfall accumulation totals, the forecasters at The Weather Channel have. If their current models prove true, we could see around ten inches of snow, which falls remarkably in line with the Frymire Forecast.

The Weather Channel
The Weather Channel
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The Weather Channel
The Weather Channel
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Of course, we're still nearly a week out from impact, so the forecast could and likely will change. But, for now, we're going to prepare ourselves that the Japanese elm tree the Frymire family uses, may not have gone out on a limb after all.

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Gallery Credit: KATELYN LEBOFF

 

 

 

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